Come see us on Campobello!

After more than one year operating behind a close border, we are cautiously optimistic that our border might be reopened during late summer or fall. Meanwhile, we accept fully vaccinated persons or people from the same family group living in the same household.

As has been our practice, our van can pick you up at any place on Campobello. As soon as the border is open again we can also offer pickups in Lubec, Maine. We do custom private tours and groups are welcome.

Specialty tours, also in combination with Tours to f.ex. St.Andrews can be tailored to your personal wishes. Should you arrive from the U.S. by marine vessel, please call 1-888-CANPASS (1-888-226 7277) for your border check-in. International Boat Arrivals can be processed at Welshpool Landing (welshpoollanding.com)

Coming from the U.S. you will need your passport and please remember that Campobello is on Atlantic Time.

(Eastern Time+1hr.)

For reservations please call or email a day prior to your intended visit. Any later attempt to make a reservation may go unsuccessful as we might be on a tour just when you call.

Thanks for visiting and be welcome to the island.

2021 Rates:

3 hrs Van-Tour across the Island CAD 40/person, USD 30/person

Walking Tours: CAD 35/hr. pp USD 25/hr.pp

All prices add 15%tax

PRIVATE TOURS: Call for individual rates.

Reservations:

1-506 752 1901

1-207 263 6076

Useful information on crossing our border to the United States: LINK


COVID-19 INFO:
Travel advisory: COVID-19 border measures for Campobello Islan

News release

May 01, 2021 Campobello Island, New Bruswick

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is committed to limiting the spread of COVID-19 in Canada, while facilitating trade and essential travel. Given this, the CBSA is reminding New Brunswickers that travelling to and from Campobello Island through the United States (U.S.) is international travel and constitutes exiting Canada. To gain re-entry into Canada, travellers must report to a CBSA port of entry.

The temporary restriction on all discretionary travel at the Canada-U.S. borderis being extended on a monthly basis. All travel of an optional or discretionary nature, such as tourism and recreation, is covered by these measures.

While Canadian citizens, permanent residents, and Registered Indians under the Indian Act continue to enter Canada by right, they remain subject to COVID-19 entry screening measures and must comply with the mandatory 14-day requirement to quarantine or isolate if not exempt.

Exemptions to quarantine and isolation requirements are currently in place to ensure that critical infrastructure, essential services and economic supply chains continue between Canada and the U.S. Exemptions are also in place for residents of Campobello Island who are asymptomatic and must cross the border on a day-to-day basis for work, or to obtain essential goods and services. These exemptions do not apply to residents of mainland New Brunswick who wish to visit Campobello Island.

Travellers are required to wear a non-medical mask or face covering upon entry to Canada and while in transit to isolation or quarantine, unless the mask or face covering needs to be removed for security or safety reasons. Travellers presenting symptoms consistent with COVID-19 will be referred to a Public Health Agency of Canada staff member for further assessment.

Trip Planner

inspirock

Thursday, September 3, 2015

SHARK!

This morning we were alerted that a big shark had stranded on the beach at Lubec. ME.

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Naturally, my first thought was getting over there to take pictures.

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This is not one big people-eating white shark monster, but a 30ft long vegetarian “Basking Shark”.

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Marine-Biologists from Eastport were already on site to take samples to see whether the animal had been suffering of any illness.

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I got there just in time before the first cuts were made into his muscles.

And here is some info about the species:

The basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) is the second largest living fish, after the whale shark, and one of three plankton-eating sharks besides the whale shark and megamouth shark. It is a cosmopolitan migratory species, found in all the world's temperate oceans. It is a slow-moving filter feeder and has anatomical adaptations for filter feeding, such as a greatly enlarged mouth and highly developed gill rakers. Its snout is conical and the gill slits extend around the top and bottom of its head. The gill rakers, dark and bristle-like, are used to catch plankton as water filters through the mouth and over the gills. The basking shark is usually greyish-brown, with mottled skin. The caudal (tail) fin has a strong lateral keel and a crescent shape. The teeth of the basking shark are very small and numerous, and often number one hundred per row. The teeth have a single conical cusp, are curved backwards, and are the same on both the upper and lower jaws. Adults typically reach 6-8 m (20-26 ft.) in length.

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Basking sharks are believed to overwinter in deep waters. They may be found in either small schools or alone. Small schools in the Bay of Fundy and the Hebrides have been seen swimming nose to tail in circles in what may be a form of mating behaviour. Despite their large size and threatening appearance, basking sharks are not aggressive and are harmless to humans.

It has long been a commercially important fish, as a source of food, shark fin, animal feed, and shark liver oil. Overexploitation has reduced its populations to the point where some have disappeared and others need protection.

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